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weight to the forceful argument here presented. The book has already found a wide circle of readers and in its new dress will no doubt find its field distinctly broadened. Urgent Symptoms in Medical Practice. By Robert Saundby, M.D., Edin., ladies viagra tablets Lieutenant-Colonel, R.A.M.C. (T.) Price, $2.10 net. New Yoi-k: Longmans, Green & Co.; London: Edward Arnold, 1915. The contents of this volume completely belie its title. The symptoms described in it are not all urgent by any means and diseases are described as well as symptoms. It is "intended to be a handy work of reference for the busy practitioner or student who desires to learn quickly, without the delay and labor of consulting sev- eral volumes, the significance of a particular symptom." The author has missed the opportunity of producing a really valuable book by not living up to the title. One can readily imagine how much use would be made of a work which discussed symptoms ladies viagra tablets only and told the dis- eases in which they might be found. Instead we have here an abridged encyclopedia or extended dictionary containing brief articles on many topics and including more or less treatment. The result is often far from satisfactory. The length of the article is often out of proportion to its apparent value, as, for instance, the one on albinism is longer than that on acidosis. Leuco- cytosis gets less than one page and is extremely inade- quate, and Gait is given ladies viagra tablets four lines. There are some grave errors, as where under the heading Monoplegia the author says that anterior poliomyelitis is caused by the meningococcus of Weichselbaum. Under hema- temesis is discussed the treatment of bleeding piles. In fact, one gets the impression that the author started out with a worthy idea, but either found the job too big for him or else had too little time to finish it properly. An Introduction to the Study of the Endocrine Glands and Internal Secretions. Lane Medical Lectures, 1913. By Sir Edward Schafer, Regius Professor of Physiology, University of Edinburgh. Price, 75 cents. Stanford University, California, 1914. In this monograph Professor Schafer gives us an au- thoritative account of what is known of the ductless glands and the internal secretions. The book is evi- dently a copy of the lectures as they were delivered, for there is neither preface nor index. The lectures are entitled: 1. General considerations how often can you take viagra ladies viagra tablets regarding internal secretions and the organs which furnish them. 2. The function of the thyroid apparatus. 3. The functions of the adrenal apparatus. 4. The pituitary body or hjT)0- physis cerebri. 5. The internal secretions of ladies viagra tablets the pineal gland; of the alimentary mucous membrane; of the pan- creas, and of the sexual organs. The author uses the term "endocrine gland" to imply "an organ which is known to form some specific chemical substance within its cells and to pass this directly or indirectly into the blood stream." He attributes the activity of the internal secretions to "hormones" and "chalones, the former of which have a stimulating action and the latter an inhibitory action. He also introduces the word "auta- coid" as a generic term to how often can you take viagra include both hormones and chalones. "The work will be welcomed by all students of physiology and by all who are interested in the newer methods in therapeutics. Alveodental Pyorrhea. By Charles C. Bass, M.D.. Professor of Experimental Medicine at the Tulane Medical College; and Foster M. Johns, M.D., In- structor in the Laboratories of Clinical Medicine at the Tulane Medical College. Illustrated. Price $2.50 net. Philadelphia and London: W. B. Saund- ers Company, 1915. This is a book of particularly timely interest and im- portance ladies viagra tablets in view of the recent discovery of the patho- genic role of the Endameba buccalis in the causation of so-called pyorrhea alveolaris. The authors present a history of the investigations with reference to the amebje whose normal habitat is the mouth. They note that in 1849 Gros described an Ameba giyigivalis. The credit for the discovery of the Endameba buccalis as the cause of alveodental pyorrhea and of the favorable effect upon the lesions produced by the local use of emetine hydrochloride, belongs to Smith and Barrett who announced their results in July, 1914. although Bass and Johns made this discovery independently but reported their results two months later. The latter investigators were, however, the first to shovv' the prompt curative action of emetine hydrochloride when employed hypodermically. In this volume they describe the etiology of alveodental pyorrhea whose specific cause they find is chiefly the Endameba buccalis. Sec- ondary factors are possibly a diminution in individual resistance and chiefly a trauma to the gums with hard tooth brushes, floss, picking the teeth, etc. The morbid processes are described with the aid of many excellent drawings: the contagiousness of the disease (the com- mon drinking cup is tabooed even in the home) ; the s>^nptomatology, bleeding from the gums being D»ob- ably the earliest symptom; the diagnosis, including a detailed description of the technique of examining for the specific organism; and finally the treatment and the pronhylaxis. In a full discussion of the treatment the authors state that they have found that in a large percentage of cases ipecac given in suitable dosage by mouth causes the disappearance of endamebse about as quickly as emetine given hynodermieallv. This book will repay reading by the general practitioner. Oct. 2. 19151 MEDICAL RECORD. 583 ^nrirty BJriinrts. AMERICAN CLIMATOLOGICAL AND CLINICAL ASSOCIATION.